The Day of the Dead in Mexico a Lively Tradition

The Day of the Dead in Mexico and

Pluma Oaxaca Coffee

The Day of the Dead or Dia de Muertos is celebrated every year in Mexico between October 31st and November 2nd. It is an important festivity in which families honour their beloved ones who have passed away. This tradition started many years ago in the ancient Mexican cultures.
According to this tradition, during the Day of the Dead the spirits of our loved ones who have passed away come to visit their families. For this reason the Day of the Dead families joyfully await the spirits at home and make colourful altars or ofrendas to welcome them.
On these altars families place favourite foods of the deceased, such as mole negro, coloradito, sweets, fruits, cigarettes, chocolate, coffee, flowers, a shot of tequila, a glass of water, pan de muertos (a special bread to celebrate the Day of the Dead) and pictures of the loved one, now a spirit. During the Day of the Dead families also visit cemeteries, decorate the graves and spend time there.
Because the Day of the Dead is a living tradition that has passed through generations for thousands of years, and because it is an important representation of Mexican culture, in 2008 UNESCO recognized this festivity as part of the intangible cultural heritage of the humanity.
Every year tourists from all over the world come to the state of Oaxaca in southern Mexico where our Pluma Mountain Coffee grows to celebrate the Day of the Dead. Oaxaca is well known for its cultural heritage so international and national tourists come to Oaxaca to witness and participate in the traditional Day of the Dead festivities.
It is a nice experience to visit the cemeteries in Oaxaca during the Day of the Dead. You can feel the mysticism and magic surrounding the atmosphere. During the Day of the Dead the cemeteries are full of colourful flowers such as the marigold flower (“cempasuchil in Spanish”) that is a very representative flower of Mexico characterized by its bright yellow colour and soft petals. This flower only blooms during this season.
In Oaxaca some families also visit the cemetery at night to wait for their beloved spirits and while waiting for them they have a cup of Café de Olla or Mexican Style Coffee, along with the traditional Mexican round and sweet bread that is made for the Day of the Dead: Pan de Muertos. This soft bread is decorated on the top with different shapes (made of flour and sugar) suggestive of bones and sprinkled with sesame seeds. Pan de Muertos is an essential element of the altar and closely associated with this celebration.
So every time you have a cup of Pluma Mountain Coffee you are also bringing to your mouth the mysticism of the Mexican traditions. Mexico Real Cafe is proud and happy to share with you our magic, mysticism and lively Mexican traditions.
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